Home / STAAD

Dam Safety in an Earthquake

An earthquake can cause a dam to crack or dislocate, or even cause its component blocks to detach. The damage can result in uncontrolled water release or a catastrophic flood. Numerical methods such as finite element analysis play an important role in assessing the possible seismic damage to dams. In this blog post, we show how ADINA was used by a team of engineers in Switzerland for this challenging task.

Read More >

Pulsating Moving Load in STAAD CONNECT Edition

This content delves into the fascinating subject of pulsating moving loads on bridges, flyovers, and similar structures. Also known as dynamic moving loads, these forces are generated by the periodic vertical force of moving vehicle wheels, caused by an unbalanced mass. This unbalanced mass can be caused by a number of factors, such as uneven weight distribution within the vehicle, or a defect in the wheel itself. Structural analysis software like STAAD is widely used to simulate the static response of moving loads on structures. However, simulating the dynamic effects of pulsating moving loads is not as straightforward. The video expertly guides you through the process of using STAAD’s time history feature to simulate the dynamic response of a structure to a pulsating moving load. The video guides a step-by-step explanation of how to effectively use the time history feature in STAAD. From understanding the parameters that must be considered when setting up the simulation, such as speed and frequency of the load, to interpreting and analyzing the results of the simulation to gain proper understanding of the dynamic behavior of the structure under the applied load. Overall, the video offers a comprehensive and engaging look into the complex subject

Read More >

Steady State Analysis for Variable Input Frequency in STAAD

Every structure has its own unique natural frequency exhibited while disturbed by some external dynamic force. The external dynamic force can be harmonic or non-harmonic. If that forcing function is harmonic with the exciting frequency and close to the natural frequency of the structure, a resonance-like event could arise, which is catastrophic and undesirable for the overall structural performance. This type of harmonic excitation is exhibited mostly by the rotating machine. Say for example, a rotating machine is sitting on the foundation structure, then the designer needs to ensure that the resonance event is properly captured in the analysis, and this dynamic amplification is taken care of in the foundation design. In this type of situation, the harmonic excitation leads to the steady state problem where the transient part is discarded. However, in reality, the machine foundation is subjected to the variable range of the operating frequency. When the machine starts with zero frequency until it attains the maximum speed with highest frequency, the foundation experiences the spectrum of input frequencies. The interest of the engineer is to capture the moment the resonance can be expected, hence the steady state analysis for the variable frequency is required. The video content

Read More >

Multiple Response Spectrum Curves With Different Damping Properties in STAAD

Each material has unique damping properties. If you want to analyze a structure composed of both steel and concrete you will have two different RS data with different damping properties for each material.  For example the first floor of a building is made of concrete and the floors above are made of steel. You can set different damping values for each material, but the RS curve to be used would only have a single damping value. To solve this you can define two different RS data pairs with unique damping properties for each material and assign them to their respective elements for analysis. This video will walk you through the procedure to define multiple RS data sets with different damping properties and instruct the program to analyze a structure with multiple damping properties. https://youtu.be/cdVg-TlvRLQ Related Articles  STAAD Learning Path

Read More >

Retaining Wall Model in STAAD

The most common type of retaining wall section is tapered with a stepped pattern. You can model the retaining wall in STAAD Analytical Modeler and generate the finite element mesh. Using the STAAD.Pro Physical Modeler interface you can modify geometrical as well as loading information anytime without having to delete the meshed model.

Read More >

Import Spreadsheet in STAAD Foundation Advanced

STAAD Foundation Advanced (SFA) is a powerful software for designing various types foundations, be it in building,  industrial or plant structure.  However, there has been a long-standing requirement for demonstration of the workflow on importing the support reaction and other information directly from spreadsheet to SFA. This is required when the engineer working on SFA doesn’t have STAAD on his computer and his client or colleague wants to  provide him with the support reaction values determined post STAAD analysis. The best way is exchanging the support reaction extracted from STAAD through spreadsheet. This video walks you through the step-by-step procedures to set the proper format of the spreadsheet and then import it to SFA. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZudEQQ0Xf0

Read More >

Seismic Mass Modeler in STAAD CONNECT Edition

This content is intended to give a quick tour on how to generate the MASS modeling for seismic analysis.
For a model that needs to have the static seismic as well as the response spectrum defined (mainly for the base shear comparison and scaling up the response quantities by “base shear due from static seismic” / “base shear due from response spectrum”), one must manually define the seismic weight and the mass modeling for both static seismic and response spectrum respectively. Unfortunately, this procedure can be very time-consuming if the model is large as the inertial information is to be defined twice in two separate situations.

Read More >